mehmet cakir

Global conference showcases drought science

August 29th, 2013

World leading research and development capabilities in drought-related agricultural science will be showcased at the InterDrought-IV Conference from September 2 to 6.

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Murdoch University academics scoop Professional Development Awards

May 11th, 2011

Professional Development Awards worth $5000 have been awarded to Professor Dr Mehmet Cakir and Senior Lecturer Dr Gabrielle Musk.

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Rust threatens world's wheat crops

June 1st, 2010

A Murdoch University researcher is battling a deadly wheat fungus that is threatening the world’s wheat crops.

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Safeguarding Australia's crops

April 22nd, 2010

Safeguarding Australias crops

Thirty key scientists from around the world are gathering at an international workshop to focus on the devastating Russian Wheat Aphid, an invader of all major wheat-growing areas in the world except Australia.

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Engage with Canberra to ensure future of science, says Shadow Minister

March 26th, 2010

Sophie Mirabella, Shadow Minister for Innovation, Industry, Science and Research, flew in from Canberra to tour the Murdoch-based WA State Agricultural Biotechnology Centre (SABC) and to discuss capacity building.

Her visit followed from Murdoch’s Associate Professor Mehmet Cakir’s attendance at the“Science meets Parliament” forum in Canberra this month where he extended the invitation to Mrs Mirabella.

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$3.4 million to beat Russian wheat aphid threat

October 31st, 2008

A Murdoch University-led study will receive a total of $3.4 million to research cereal strains resistant to the devastating Russian wheat aphid, which has invaded all major wheat growing areas of the world except Australia.

With $1.4 million from the Grains Research and Development Corporation, and $2 million from project collaborators, this research aims to prevent this aphid from threatening Australia’s grains industry, which would potentially cause wheat crop yield losses of up to 70 per cent and even higher losses in barley.

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