Researchers fighting adverse drug reactions

April 19, 2017

Professor Elizabeth Phillips, Director of the Centre for Clinical Pharmacology and Infectious Diseases at IIID

Around 6 per cent of in-patient hospital admissions are caused by adverse drug reactions (ADR), costing an estimated $136 billion annually.

Professor Elizabeth Phillips, Director of the Centre for Clinical Pharmacology and Infectious Diseases at Murdoch University’s Institute for Immunology and Infectious Diseases (IIID), is leading a project to find ways to reduce the number of people experiencing ADRs.

She said: “Serious and life-threatening immunologically-mediated ADRs are driven largely by genetic factors and present both a physical and financial burden to patients, families and healthcare services around the world.

“We aim to find ways to predict which specific drugs are more likely to cause ADRs before they are approved for use in humans.

“Eventually, we hope to be able to identify patients who are more genetically at risk of developing a severe ADR.

Professor Phillips will be presenting her research on personalised medicine at Western Australia’s premier medical research conference, Science on the Swan, in Fremantle on 3 May.

Registration details and more information is available at  www.scienceontheswan.com.au

 

Print This Post Print This Post

Media contact: Pepita Smyth
Tel: (08) 9360 1289  |  Mobile: 0417 171 551  |  Email: p.smyth@murdoch.edu.au
Categories: General, Events, Research
Tags: , , ,

Leave a comment

You can use these tags : <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <s> <strike> <strong>

We read every comment and will make every effort to approve each new comment within one working day. To ensure speedy posting, please keep your comments relevant to the topic of discussion, free of inappropriate language and in-line with the editorial integrity of this newsroom. If not, your comments may not be published.

Thanks for commenting!