Murdoch students complete decade of free chiro care in North West

August 31, 2015

The 2015 chiro team pictured on Mt Nameless (Jarndunmunha), L to R; Dr Lyndon Amorin-Woods (supervisor), Dylan Moltoni, Nils Osseiran, Kikki Grevle Iveland, Kristen Sheppard, James Levien, Peta Chien, Dr Bill Hayward (supervisor) Alyssa Chan, Marthin Mikkelsen (front).

The 2015 chiro team pictured on Mt Nameless (Jarndunmunha), L to R; Dr Lyndon Amorin-Woods (supervisor), Dylan Moltoni, Nils Osseiran, Kikki Grevle Iveland, Kristen Sheppard, James Levien, Peta Chien, Dr Bill Hayward (supervisor) Alyssa Chan, Marthin Mikkelsen (front).

Murdoch University fifth year chiropractic students offered free treatments to members of the public in the remote Pilbara region recently – the 10th consecutive year students from Murdoch have made the trip.

The students visited the townships of Tom Price and Paraburdoo and the Indigenous communities of Wakathuni and Bellary Springs in the first two weeks of August to provide spinal health checks and chiropractic care under the watchful eye of their two supervisors – Dr Bill Hayward and Dr Lyndon Amorin-Woods.

Project coordinator Dr Amorin-Woods said the trips benefitted the communities they visited and the students.

“In remote communities people have no access to chiropractic and even if they did, many would not be able to afford it,” he said.

“It’s also a great opportunity for our students who get clinical exposure to different sorts of cases. For many this might also be the first time they deliver care to Indigenous people. Before they go up north they are required to undergo cultural awareness training. Many of the students report the experience as life-changing.”

All participating students have previously gained experience working within the University’s Chiropractic Clinic, offering care to the public, at the South Street campus.

One of the students who participated this year, James Levien said the experience gave him great insight into what it felt like to be working full time in the chiropractic profession.

“I thoroughly enjoyed the experience of the recent trip up north to Tom Price,” he said.

“It was very clear through patient feedback that our services up there were very respected and appreciated and that made my experience a lot better. The program also gave us a good experience of seeing numerous people which helped improve my patient interaction skills.”

The project was made possible in 2015 by the mining company Rio Tinto and the Shire of Ashburton.

“We owe these supporters a huge debt of gratitude, said Associate Professor Bruce Walker, Head of the Murdoch Chiropractic program.

“Without Rio Tinto’s funding each year these outreach clinics would not have happened. The commitment to the local communities shown by support for this project is greatly appreciated by the people in those regions.”

Associate Professor Walker added the chiropractic program within the School of Health Professions encouraged students to undertake a broad range of clinical experiences prior to graduation.

“The main purpose of our visits have been to build long-term relationships with local Aboriginal people in the hope of delivering ongoing care,” he said. “We hope we can continue to take chiro students to this region for many more years to come.”

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