Local students AIME-ing high

August 20, 2013

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Students from Murdoch University are working with local high schools to help Indigenous students achieve their dreams.

Murdoch University's AIME mentors with His Excellency Malcolm McCusker and his wife Tonya.

The Australian Indigenous Mentoring Experience (AIME) program is now up and running in Western Australia, with more than 100 Indigenous students already participating in mentoring sessions at Murdoch's South Street campus.

AIME's Reece Harley said the program has been a success in other states.

"AIME is about giving Indigenous high school students the skills, opportunities and confidence to finish school at the same rate as their peers," he said.

"More than 350 Western Australian high school students, from 30 schools, have been involved in our mentoring and tutoring program since May this year."

Students from Melville Senior High School, Warnbro Community High School, Kelmscott Senior High School, Seton Catholic College and Cecil Andrews Senior High School participated in their second Outreach session this month.

His Excellency Malcolm McCusker, Governor of Western Australia, watched on as Year 9 and 10 students explored the issues of drugs and alcohol.

"It was an honour to have the Governor and Mrs McCusker join us for the session," Mr Harley said.

"They took the time to speak to students and mentors, and seemed really engaged and excited about the program."

Governor Malcolm McCusker, along with his wife Tonya McCusker, were given AIME hoodies to mark the occasion.

AIME's Outreach program has students from Years 9 to 12 spend four full days at a university campus exploring a range of issues, including leadership, respect, racism and resume building.

Each high school student is partnered with a university student, who acts as a mentor and also participates in activities.

"High school students get the opportunity to interact with young people who have completed secondary studies and know about the challenges they’re facing," Mr Harley said.

"The university students get to engage hands-on with Indigenous Australia, while developing cultural awareness and communication skills."

Starting with just 25 students in 2005, AIME is now working with more than 2300 Indigenous high school students across Australia.

To learn more, visit www.aimementoring.com.

Media contact: Candice Barnes
Tel: (08) 9360 2474  |  Mobile: 0408 201 309  |  Email: c.barnes@murdoch.edu.au
Categories: Domestic students, Future Students, General, International students, kulbardi, Teaching and Learning
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