History of oceans explored

November 2, 2012

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Anyone with an interest in maritime history will enjoy two upcoming conferences being held in Fremantle and hosted by Murdoch University.

The first one Oceans Past IV: Multidisciplinary Perspectives on the History and Future of Marine Animal Populations will examine the diversity, distribution and abundance of marine life in the world’s seas over time and investigate historical interactions between humankind and marine environments.

Professor Poul Holm, Director of the History of Marine Animal Populations (HMAP) research initiative and Trinity Long Room Hub Professor of Humanities at Trinity College Dublin, will give the keynote address titled ‘World War II and the Fisheries – Environmental Reprieve and Repercussions’.

“The Second World War cast a long shadow on the development of post-war fishing patterns and ocean management of the North Atlantic and the Pacific,” Professor Holm said.

“In direct terms the war caused a temporary reprieve from fisheries for marine animals and had significant impact on human nutrition and coastal settlement.

“In indirect terms the consequences of war may be measured both in terms of a war dividend to the nations that managed to get fishing operations going quickly and in terms of new fish-finding technologies.

“The most enduring legacy of the war was the development of new exclusive economic zones.”

The Oceans Past IV: Multidisciplinary Perspectives on the History and Future of Marine Animal Populations conference will be held from November 7 to 9 at the University of Notre Dame.  A program is available here.

The second conference Dimensions of the Indian Ocean World Past: Sources and Opportunities for Interdisciplinary Work in Indian Ocean World History will examine the world’s first global economy: the Indian Ocean World from the 9th to the 19th centuries.  The conference will delve into the history of trade and contact across the oceans.

Professor Gwyn Campbell, Canada Research Chair in Indian Ocean World History at McGill University and Director of the Indian Ocean World Centre at McGill University, will present the keynote lecture ‘The Making of the Indian Ocean World Global Economy’.

Professor Campbell will examine the issues surrounding the growing interest in the concept of an Indian Ocean World (IOW) global economy.

“The economic, social and political foundations of the IOW date back two millennia and are related to the monsoons, a system of regularly alternating winds and currents unique to the Indian Ocean, and Indonesian, and South and East China Seas,” he said.

“The monsoons exerted a huge influence over the lands and societies around these inter-connected bodies of water: monsoon rains underpinned agricultural production, while monsoon winds created the possibility of direct trans-oceanic sail which facilitated the rise of a sophisticated, durable structure of long-distance maritime exchange of commodities, ideas, technology and people.

“This system economic historians refer to as a global economy, as distinct from the modern international economy which began to take shape in the nineteenth century.”

The Dimensions of the Indian Ocean World Past: Sources and Opportunities for Interdisciplinary Work in Indian Ocean World History will be held from November 12 to 14 at The Western Australian Maritime Museum.  A program is available here.

Registration for Oceans Past IV: Multidisciplinary Perspectives on the History and Future of Marine Animal Populations can be made here, or for Dimensions of the Indian Ocean World Past: Sources and Opportunities for Interdisciplinary Work in Indian Ocean World History here.

Media contact: Hayley Mayne
Tel: (08) 9360 2491  |  Mobile: 0400 297 221  |  Email: h.mayne@murdoch.edu.au
Categories: Asian studies, political science and social sciences, Events, General
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